Home > Search Clinical Trials > Aging
Clinical Trials: Aging
IRB No. 03-340-1 (Dr. Janet McElhaney, PI): T-Cell Responses Predict Influenza Risk in Older Adults.
The study has been designed to help better understand the potential ways to make the current flu vaccine mire effective. High-risk older adults >60 years with heart disease; healthy older adults >60 years ; and healthy young adults between 20 and 40 years of age will be administered the current approved influenza vaccine.
IRB No. 07-131-1 (Dr. Jonathan Covault, PI): Behavioral Gene Bank
The purpose of this registry/repository is to collect diagnostic data (psychiatric and medical diagnoses) and tissue specimens from subjects and/or family members in order to build a Behavioral Gene Bank (BGB). The registry/repository aims to study; subjects with known or suspected genetic or medical syndromes; families with high concentrations of psychiatric illness; and subjects with dysmorphic features or other clinical characteristics suggestive of a genetic or chromosomal disorder. Relatives of individuals with these features and healthy controls will also participate. Subjects will be invited to participate in further behavioral studies in the future.
IRB No. 12-188-2 (Dr. George Kuchel, PI): Impact of Aging T Cell Responses to Influenza Vaccination
Participate in our research study on the immune system looking at how we can use vaccines to protect us against infections. With aging, that system does not function as well. We think this research will provide information that could eventually lead to more effective vaccines for preventing influenza illness and potentially other infectious diseases in older people. Men and Women must be 20-30 years old OR 50 years of age and Older; Have been vaccinated in last year, but not for current flu season; Do not have any Immunosuppressive diseases or on any Immunosuppressive therapy. Participants must be willing to come in for 4 study visits where blood will be drawn at 3 visits. Standard Flu vaccinations will be given as part of the study at no charge. Monetary compensation will be provided.
IRB No. 13-048-6 (Dr. David Steffens, PI): Neurobiology and Acute Treatment Outcomes of Late Life Depression
This study seeks to further the scientific understanding of the complex relationships among depression, neuroticism, persistent depression and cognitive impairment. An aim is to identify older depressed adults who are at risk for negative outcomes by studying older adults, assessing their level of neuroticism and cognitive performance, their response to treatment and their cognitive outcomes over time. This group over time will be compared to a group of non-depressed older adults.
IRB No. 13-099-3 (Dr. George Kuchel, PI): Embryonic and pluripotent stem cell-produced factors as novel therapeutic candidates for improved aged muscle function and regenerative responses in humans
Study description not available
IRB No. 13-041H-3 (Dr. Richard Fortinsky, PI): Improving Community Ambulation After Hip Fracture
The Community Ambulation Project plans to enroll hip fracture patients (admitted to John Dempsey Hospital & Hartford Hospital) to assess the ability of in-home PT programs to improve walking within their home and community.
IRB No. 14-194J-3 (Dr. George Kuchel, PI): Impact of aging on gene expression and RNA splice variants in peripheral blood cells
The primary objective of this IRB proposal is to obtain preliminary feasibility and pilot data for the submission of a competitive renewal this fall for Dr Palucka's HIPC U19 grant currently funded by NIH. PRIMARY HYPOTHESIS We will be able to gain a comprehensive view of the genomic alterations associated with aging and frailty using immunological and system biology approaches. Furthermore, we theorize that these changes will be associated with specific microbiome composition. SPECIFIC AIMS This is a single-center exploratory study to carry out transcriptional and microbiome profiling analysis to gain a comprehensive view of genomic alterations associated with aging and frailty. Aim 1: To collect the samples from well-characterized volunteer cohorts. Aim 2: To establish whole blood isoform profiles. Aim 3: To establish epigenetic profiles of PBMCs and sorted blood cells Aim 4: To characterize microbiome in saliva and stool samples. SIGNIFICANCE It becomes critically important to apply system biology approaches and in-depth genomics to understand aging and related alterations. Identifying the immunologic parameters that correlate with or predict immune alterations will have a significant impact on the increased understanding of disease physiology in older age and eventually novel biomarkers and targets for therapy. RELEVANCE Recent technological breakthroughs have made the study of biological systems on a large scale a reality, thus offering unprecedented opportunities to comprehensively profile genome and immune responses in human subjects. A major challenge when engaging in such studies is to establish baseline values in subjects over time under "healthy" conditions. This data will be used as a basis for design of futures studies identifying changes occurring in response to challenge as for example acute infection or vaccination.
IRB No. 15-006-3 (Dr. George Kuchel, PI): Immune Response to High-Dose vs. Standard Dose Influenza Vaccine
This is a 5-year randomized study of split-virus influenza vaccine (SVV) in a high-dose (HD) vs. standard dose (SD) formulation in each of five influenza seasons to define the key determinants of vaccine-mediated protection against influenza and how these immunologic mediators may be enhanced by vaccination with a U.S. approved high-dose influenza vaccine in older people. Trial Objectives The strategic objectives of this proposal are to conduct a randomized study of the U.S. approved SD-SVV vs. HD-SVV to establish GrzB activity and the IFN :IL-10 ratio in influenza-stimulated PBMC as biomarkers of clinical protection against the serious complications of influenza infection; develop a clinical tool (frailty index) and biomarkers (CMV status and bGrzB activity) for use in point-of-care testing to predict the response to influenza vaccination and appropriately target other prevention strategies to reduce the impact of influenza illness in particularly vulnerable older people; and translate these findings to testing new vaccines for their potential to significantly enhance protection against the serious complications of influenza in older adults. In the process, we will determine whether the Frailty Index [31], as a predictor of functional decline and mortality [32], can be used as point-of-care testing in the management of influenza. Table 1 summarizes the 5-year plan. The experimental design incorporates extensive experience in measuring T-cell responses to influenza vaccination and a study design that reflects an understanding of the variables that contribute to the heterogeneity of health and frailty in older adults. The overall experimental plan is described in three sections including a) Study Populations, b) Experimental Design including the Overall study protocol and Specific Aims 1-3), and c) Tests and Assays. Study Hypothesis (Aim 1) Determine whether a high dose vaccine performs better than standard doses Study Hypothesis (Aim 2): Evaluate the association of degree of frailty to cytomegalovirus (CMV) status and bGrzB levels in resting T cells. Study Hypothesis (Aim 3): Establish predictors of vaccine-mediated protection that can be developed for point-of-care testing
IRB No. 17-021S-1 (Dr. Richard Fortinsky, PI): Care Management for Cognitively Vulnerable Older Adults
The purpose of the study is to compare ways to support the health of people over age 65 who may be experiencing signs of memory problems, feelings of sadness, or feelings of confusion. The study will look at how nurses, social workers and other health care professionals can help older adults get the care they need and to stay as healthy as possible. This type of support provided by these healthcare professionals is called "care management services". The study will compare two different care management teams: "Home Based Care Team" and "Telephone Based Care Team". The "Home Based Care Team" (HBCT) is composed of a nurse practitioner who is specifically trained to provide care and psychosocial support to older adults, social worker, physical and occupational therapists, registered dietician, pharmacist and community health educator. The Home Based Care Team nurse practitioner will lead this care management team. Interaction with the team will primarily take place within the older adult's home. The "Telephone Based Care Team" (TBCT) is composed of a nurse care manager who will assess the older adult's current health status and provide referrals to other healthcare professionals as needed. Interaction with the "Telephone Based Care Team" will primarily take place over the phone.