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Clinical Trials: Skin
IRB No. 03-007-1 (Dr. Ernst Reichenberger, PI): Genetic Analysis of Human Disorders: Keloid Formation
The purpose of this study is to identify genes which cause or contribute to keloid formation. Keloids are wounds which grow beyond the margin of the original skin wound.
IRB No. 13-014-1 (Dr. Bruce Strober, PI): A Multicenter, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study Comparing the Efficacy and Safety of LY2439821 to Etanercept and Placebo in Patients with Moderate-to-Severe Plaque Psoriasis
Study description not available
IRB No. 15-118-1 (Dr. Bruce Strober, PI): A Phase 3, Multicenter, Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo and Active Comparator-controlled Study Evaluating the Efficacy and Safety of Guselkumab for the Treatment of Subjects with Moderate to Severe Plaque-type Psoriasis (VOYAGE 1)
Study description not available
IRB No. 15-115-1 (Dr. Santhanam Lakshminarayanan, PI): A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Phase II Study to Investigate the Efficacy and Safety of Riociguat in Patients with Diffuse Cutaneous Systemic Sclerosis (dcSSc)
The purpose of this study is to investigate the effectiveness and safety of riociguat (BAY 63-2521) in patients with diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis. It is approved by the FDA for the treatment of 2 forms of hypertension in lung blood vessels, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Riociguat works by stimulating an enzyme in cells, which increases the production of another molecule. The resulting effects are a decrease in tissue fibrosis and relaxation of smooth muscle cells (cells found in particular internal organs and blood vessels). It is proposed that riociguat may offer protection against worsening diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis.
IRB No. 19-036-1 (Dr. Jun Lu, PI): Rheumatology-Dermatology Combined Clinic Patient Registry
The Rheumatology-Dermatology Combined Clinic Patient Registry is a prospective registry that collects patient data within the UConn Department of Dermatology combined clinic for patients being treated for both rheumatologic and dermatologic conditions. Both dermatologists and rheumatologists participate in care for patients suffering from connective tissue disease with both cutaneous and rheumatological manifestations. By establishing combined rheumatology-dermatology clinic, patients will receive collaborative care from both specialties in the same visit. The combined multidisciplinary clinic offers the opportunity for improving care quality, patient satisfaction, and continued education and professional development for physicians. The protocol includes patients over the age of 18 that are being treated in the UConn combined rheumatology-dermatology clinic. This registry will gather data over a 10 year period for future research regarding improving patient care, diagnosis, treatment and long term outcomes for this subspecialty clinic.
IRB No. 18-194J-1 (Dr. Bruce Strober, PI): Skin Microbiome of Inverse Psoriasis
Psoriasis is a disfiguring and disabling skin disease that affects as high as one out of 25 Americans, but the root cause is still unknown. Inverse psoriasis is a form of the disease that only affects the skin folds of the body. It causes painful, shiny, red rashes in very sensitive areas like the genitals, groin and underneath the breasts. Past studies have identified particular microbes that live within these skin folds. Collectively, the genes of these microbes are called the skin microbiome. We believe that the skin microbiome at the skin fold sites may have something to do with what causes inverse psoriasis. Currently, there have been no studies on the skin microbiome and inverse psoriasis. Therefore, we plan to be the first to identify and characterize the skin microbiome in people who have inverse psoriasis. We plan to recruit three groups of volunteers: plaque psoriatics 1) with and 2) without inverse psoriasis and 3) healthy people to determine if there are differences in their microbes that may be contributing to their inverse psoriasis lesions. Volunteers in group 2 (without inverse psoriasis) who develop Inverse Psoriasis during the course of the study will be asked to re-enroll in the study into group 4. We will prospectively track the inverse microbiome as these patients receivesystemic biologic therapies, to determine if these therapies alter the microbiome during effective treatment.In this effort, we hope to better understand psoriasis and ultimately provide substantial improvement to the quality of life for these patients.